What your kids will tell me but they won’t tell you

 

I just took my 500th conversation as a Crisis Counselor with Crisis Text Line. Crisis Text Line is free, 24/7 support for those in crisis. People of all ages text in for support. The topics that arise cover everything and many of those that text in are teens struggling with life. Volunteering for Crisis Text Line is amazing – it is an incredible experience.

As a Crisis Counselor, I learned to separate my own feelings and experiences when chatting with texters and helping them through their crises. Crisis Text Line provides amazing training to potential Crisis Counselors and I learned so much by going through it. But as a parent, it is also difficult to interact with these young people in crisis.

As parents, we do our best to make sure that our children are happy and safe. We want them to know they can come to us with their problems. We want open communication, we want to protect them for as long as we can and we want them to trust us with whatever is bothering them.   IMG_0173

But often our kids are scared to tell us how they are really feeling. They worry about how their parents will react. As a Crisis Counselor I get to hear the from texters anonymously and confidentiality in a safe space. It is incredible how teenagers open up about how they feel through text. I get to hear from teens that are struggling – that are sad and depressed and feel that there is no hope. I get to hear from teens that are scared because they binged and purged for the first time and are not sure if that means they have an eating disorder. I hear from those that are afraid because they sent inappropriate photos to someone and are terrified.  I hear from teens that cut and want to stop but do not know how.

But mostly during these open and honest chats what is surprising is how often these teenagers reveal that they are scared or worried to tell their parents that they are struggling, having thoughts of suicide or are dealing with self-harm. It is heartbreaking.

It hurts that so many respond saying their parents will get angry if they knew they were depressed. Angry? Yes. That is what they say. So many of these texters think their parents will be angry at them because they are depressed or feeling suicidal. It is devastating to hear that kids do not think their parents care, won’t help or will get angry at them for their feelings.

What it shows it that our children are scared. Our kids need us even if they say they do not. Our children need guidance and someone to watch over them even if they say they need space. I want all parents to know that they need to be compassionate and empathize with their children. That they need to tell their children it is safe to talk to them if they are hurting. That it is ok.

It is awesome to know that through their phones people can reach out for help. I wish that we could connect parents and their kids through Crisis Text Line but we cannot. It does not work that way. The way we can reach out children is by listening to them and letting them know we are there for them.

As Crisis Counselors, we are there for the texters. We are there to listen, to help and be there for the people in crisis. It feels good to help. But as Crisis Counselors, we can only do so much. As parents, we must be there always, unconditionally and no matter what.  We need our kids to know that.  

 

If you want to volunteer for Crisis Text Line, visit Crisis Text Line for more information or Contact Me to find out how AMAZING it is. 

If you or someone you know is in crisis, text HELLO to 741741 to text with a trained Crisis Counselor 24/7.  

Mental Health, Stigma and Honesty

I previously wrote a blog post about what I say when people ask me about Bryce. It is a difficult question to answer. I am an advocate for mental health awareness and for my son. I am a stigma fighter. I help raise awareness for mental health, I advocate for mental health reform. I volunteer for the Crisis Text Line, for Sheppard Pratt Health Care Center. I worked with adults with severe mental illness. I write this blog. My goal is to make people know that it makes you strong, not weak, to get help and that mental illness is no different than any other illness.

I have never shied away from telling people that Bryce had a mental illness, but it has often been difficult to explain or find the right words to describe him. It is sometimes difficult because you worry about how others will react or what people know about mental illness. It has also been frustrating because it has been confusing as to exactly what Bryce’s diagnosis is. When I asked my husband Terry, he says that he tells people simply that Bryce “has serious mental health issues”. For me, it depends on my own mood what I say. Sometimes I say that Bryce has severe special needs. Sometimes I say that Bryce has severe mental illness or that he has Bipolar Disorder, ADHD, Anxiety and developmental delays. That is a mouthful.

Yesterday we received the results of his most recent psychological and educational tests. The results stated that Bryce meets criteria for a child with Autism. Finally. We have tried to get that diagnosis for years. The doctor who did the testing and analyzed the results stated that Bryce probably always met the criteria. As of yesterday, I can say that Bryce is a child with Autism, Depression and Anxiety. It is a clear diagnosis and easy to say. I can say it again. Bryce is a child with Autism, Depression and Anxiety.

Nothing has changed between the day before yesterday and yesterday. Bryce is the same child today that he was last week. He is the same 14 year old he was two weeks ago, but he has a new diagnosis, a new label, a new way that I can described him. I have been given a new way that I can explain his behaviors, his quirkiness, the reasoning behind why he is the way he is.

But, along with this new diagnosis and label, I also feel guilty. I like the new way I can describe Bryce. Why? It is easier, clearer and of course, comes with less stigma. Yet, I am the one that is outspoken and fights stigma. I am the one who says it is ok to say you live with a mental illness. Bryce still has a mental illness. He still struggles everyday. But now we get to say Autism. Not one mention of Bipolar Disorder in the new report.

I want the stigma of mental illness to go away. I want people to think the same way about someone with Bipolar Disorder that they do about someone with cancer. But, even for me, even for someone who is an advocate for mental illness, it is easier to tell someone, Bryce is a child with Autism than Bryce is a child with Bipolar Disorder. It is also easier for me because it is less scary. Less scary that Bryce might hurt himself. But in reality, he still has suicidal ideation, he is still anxious and he still struggles with school.

So, does it even matter? I don’t know. I wish that I did. I want to say that it is not true. I want to say I am better than any words or labels. I want to say I am stigma free. I thought I was. But maybe all of us have a little stigma inside of us. We can only do our best.soical-stigma